Tay District Salmon Fisheries Board

Protecting and Improving The Tay System

PROTECTING & IMPROVING THE TAY

EASING FISH MIGRATION BY REMOVING OR ALTERING WEIR ON THE TAY SYSTEM

  • BREACHING OF CLOAN FISH FARM WEIR
    In the autumn of 2010 the owner of an old weir on the Cloan Burn agreed to allow the weir to be demolished. A contractor was employed to cut a section out of the weir.
  • While this particular weir is not a major obstacle to migrating fish its removal will help in certain years.
    This tributary of the River Earn is particularly productive for sea trout.

  • URLAR BURN WEIR REMOVAL
    In a project performed in conjunction with the Tay Ghillies Association it had been intended to remove a derelict weir from the Urlar Burn near Aberfeldy in 2008. However, suitable conditions did not occur until summer 2009 when the weir was then demolished by a contractor. The removal of this weir has opened up another 1.5km of this significant tributary to salmon in an area where accessible tributary habitat is very limited.

  • CLEARANCE OF BLOCKAGES ON THE DOWIE BURN
    The mouth of the Dowie Burn, which enters the Tay just upstream of Meikleour, was blocked by two substantial jams of branches which had backed up from the River Tay. There were concerns that this debris would prevent the entry of spawning salmon and sea trout, although an electrofishing survey did demonstrate that some salmon could at least for some of the time find passage. It was decided therefore that the blockages should be cleared. As this stream is part of an SSSI, permission was obtained from SNH and the log jams were removed during the summer of 2008 by the Board’s bailiff staff. More ...

  • OPENING OF WEIR ON THE KEITHICK BURN
    An old redundant weir on the lower reaches of the Keithick Burn prevented migratory fish from accessing this significant tributary of the lower Isla. Work was undertaken on the weir in several stages and it was finally opened to fish in the summer of 2008. The work was kindly funded by the Tay Ghillies Association and SEPA's Water Environment Restoration Fund.